The House of Hurt & other stories

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online The House of Hurt & other stories file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with The House of Hurt & other stories book. Happy reading The House of Hurt & other stories Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF The House of Hurt & other stories at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF The House of Hurt & other stories Pocket Guide.

Personally I'm inclined to think not, although I thought the children were ghastly anyway! To be fair, I read this on a plane and it's the sort of book you should really curl up with somewhere quiet on a stormy winter night. I might give it another try later. Sep 01, Mike rated it it was ok Shelves: school. Lengthy and dry Victorian era prose. The attempt of an American to be as British as possible.

The story is uninteresting, and the characters are as well. The themes in the book are generally used for critical analysis by deconstructionists, feminists, psychoanalysts, and marxists. If that tells you anything about this.


  • & Other Stories unveils store on London’s Oxford Street.
  • Paris for One and Other Stories by Jojo Moyes.
  • The Turn of the Screw and Other Stories;

A supernatural if it can really even be called that tale that is really about class identity; it sucks. I had to read it twi Lengthy and dry Victorian era prose.


  1. Santas Thanksgiving (The Santa Claus Series Book 1).
  2. The Mermaid's Pool & Other Stories | Raintown Seers.
  3. Get e-book The House of Hurt & other stories.
  4. My Name is Legion.
  5. I had to read it twice. The first time doing the first two aforementioned critical analyses. The second covering the latter two. I really don't recommend it. James is a plain and boring writer. The prose isn't even enjoyable. Dec 03, Leah rated it really liked it Shelves: horror , Ambivalent about the ambiguity This collection is made up of four stories — the novella length title story and three shorter ones.

    Read PDF The House of Hurt & other stories

    The Turn of the Screw is, of course, a classic of the horror genre, but the other three are well worth reading too. The stories are:- The Turn of the Screw — the classic story of a governess looking after two orphaned young children becomes convinced they are being haunted and corrupted by the ghosts of their previous governess and their former valet. Or is she suffering from delusions? Sir Edmund Orme — Our narrator becomes fascinated by a mother and daughter, Mrs Marden and Charlotte, because of what he feels is their peculiarly strong concern for each other.

    Eventually, she takes him into her confidence and tells him the story of her one-time lover, Sir Edmund Orme. However, Owen has different views — he despises war, and believes that politicians who lead their nations into war should be hanged, drawn and quartered. When he drops out of training, his family and friends put pressure on him to think again, and when the girl he loves implies that he is a coward, to prove her wrong he agrees to spend a night in the haunted room of his family castle The Friends of the Friends — the story of two people, a man and a woman, who share the distinction of each having seen a ghost.

    This coincidence makes their mutual friends want to bring them together, but circumstances always seem to prevent them meeting. The other one, however, as we know, can see ghosts While for the most part I found the writing good and certainly effective at conjuring up an atmosphere, I several times came across sentences so badly constructed that they required me to go back and read them again to catch the meaning, and sometimes they were still obscure after that.

    Navigation menu

    Perhaps sometimes James was doing this for effect, to add to the vagueness and ambiguity. Aside from that criticism, each of the four stories is well-structured, and the sense of vagueness that surrounds the narrative intention has the effect of leaving them open to interpretation. I found this tended to make them linger in my mind for longer than most spooky stories, as I mulled over what was beneath the surface. And generally speaking, I concluded that what was there was rather unpleasant — hints of child sexual abuse in The Turn of the Screw , a controlling lover in Sir Edmund Orme , family pressure taken to extremes in Owen Wingrave and extreme jealousy in The Friends of the Friends.

    Perhaps because the horror aspects are mostly low-key and so the underlying story stands out more than usual, or perhaps because James uses ambiguity to force the reader to, in a sense, fill in the blanks, making it feel as if the unpleasantness comes from inside her own mind. Whatever the reason, it meant that though I quite enjoyed them while reading I found they left a slightly nasty aftertaste — especially The Turn of the Screw.

    I suspect it may have been. You can probably tell that I feel quite ambivalent about this collection.

    AUTUMN BASICS // & Other Stories Haul + Try On // Fashion Mumblr

    Jul 24, Lenore. I was a little disappointed with The Turn of the Screw. I don't usually find older language difficult to read, but the style he used to tell the story was really wordy and hard to get through. I've wanted to read this story since I was young, so maybe I was expecting too much. However, I did find the telling of the ghosts and their interactions with people incredibly well-written, eerily descriptive, and overall what I was hoping to find in this story. The dialogue was choppy and difficult to fo I was a little disappointed with The Turn of the Screw.

    The dialogue was choppy and difficult to follow - I understood the nature of it; that these women were thinking the same things, and that those things were going unsaid.

    The Dandle-Bear Bridge and Other Stories

    I get that - it certainly added to the mystery, and there were several double meanings throughout the story, adding tensions both sexually and other throughout. Sometimes though, and I feel a little guilty in saying this, I just wish someone would have said what they were thinking. The mystery behind whether or not the governess was actually seeing ghosts I thought could have been emphasized more, but to be honest I was happy with it; I think I'd rather just assume they were ghosts!

    It was also a good telling of a class-based society, where certain classes shouldn't have been mixing and the consequences of when they do. I read two out of the other three stories in this edition excluded the last one due to lack of time - "The Romance of Certain Old Clothes" and "Friends of Friends".

    & Other Stories unveils store on London’s Oxford Street - News : Retail (#)

    The ending was brilliant early horror. But as far as the storytelling goes, just okay. I think I would have liked to see the second half emphasized more. Still worth a read on a cold night by the fire! I'm kind of amazed that I read this in high school, and I'm wondering what I got out of it back then. I remember putting it on the "I like this one" list, but past that, I don't know.

    After a re-read, I still put it on that list, but I imagine I've put it there for very different reasons. I've struggled a long time with my relationship with Henry James; I very much appreciate him and admire him, but sometimes I do wish he'd just get to the point.

    Woodcutter’s Wisdom and Other Favorite Stories - Max Lucado

    He seems to do this much more gingerly in the thr I'm kind of amazed that I read this in high school, and I'm wondering what I got out of it back then. He seems to do this much more gingerly in the three accompanying stories to this edition. And while they all do qualify as ghost stories, Turn of the Screw is certainly the only one I might call horrific. But the horror, to me, is absolutely internal.

    I don't trust our narrator for a minute, as I fear I may have back in high school, as I hadn't been a practised enough reader to realize I don't have to trust my narrator. I think our narrator wants a ghost story as much as we do, so she plants the images that will give her the most fright, and the true horror is that she believes her own narration.

    I think that there are two ways to approach Henry James; one is to search for his "moral", find the phrases that back up your theory, and compare them to the thousands of other James' theorists in print. There is always plenty of material ripe for analysis. James is nothing if not thorough in his reasoning. The other way is to simply let the words run over you and carry you along, and, even if you feel a bit mired in his wordiness, you will come out the other end of the paragraph with something close to epiphany.

    If for some reason you have never read Henry James before, I urge you to begin by reading his short novels and short stories, of which The Turn of the Screw and Other Stories is a worthy collection.

    To those who are not familiar with his work, James seems to be a singularly bland, even bloodless character who seems incapable to any great depths. Far from it! Why I particularly like this collection is that it includes a number of stories in which the author, being cognizant of his reputation, tries to addres If for some reason you have never read Henry James before, I urge you to begin by reading his short novels and short stories, of which The Turn of the Screw and Other Stories is a worthy collection.

    Why I particularly like this collection is that it includes a number of stories in which the author, being cognizant of his reputation, tries to address it. Usually, I like to include a quote from the author, but James does not quote well.